Cardan Capital Partners is home to avid readers who are happy to recommend good books, news and industry reports, websites and articles — and not just about finance, either. Our latest: 

Americans’ financial literacy has dropped for years. Check out this infographic that explains at a glance why that is a problem and what we can do to prepare future generations for money management and investing. 

See how financially literate you are. Answer this very short quiz. Can you get more than two questions right? (If so, you beat the average American.)

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
by Atul Gawande

Being Mortal Best-selling author and practicing surgeon Atul Gawande says nearly all of us — including and especially doctors — fail miserably to navigate the difficult and inescapable realities of aging and death. He contends that as a result, we cause even more suffering, fuel anxieties and shorten lives instead of improve them. Through research and gripping stories about his own patients and family, Dr. Gawande explains with raw honesty and empathy how our ultimate goal should not be to help ourselves and others have a good death, but, rather, a good life until the very end. He challenges conventional thinking about end-of-life care for the elderly and the terminally ill — too much of which creates false hope and robs the dying of respect and dignity, he says. He builds a strong case for reforms in patient care that challenges healthcare providers, nursing homes and assisted-living facilities to deal more directly and honestly with patients and their fears rather than promoting treatments that are often costly and futile and undermine the quality of the life that remains. Dr. Gawande eloquently challenges everyone to rethink the systems and processes that force the dying to accept decisions made for them — everything from what food to eat and clothes to wear to room temperature settings and TV schedules — and to focus instead on a person’s well-being. That well-being, Dr. Gawande says, allows the dying to maintain their autonomy and have access to what they live for.

The New New Thing
by Michael Lewis 

In this page-turner from 2014, Michael Lewis, best-selling author of Liar’s Poker, Flash Boys, Moneyball and The Big Short, recounts the history of the Internet revolution after embarking on a search of Silicon Valley for the world’s most important technology entrepreneur. He finds Jim Clark, whose achievements include founding three — as in yes, three — separate, billion-dollar companies. But this is not just a compelling, historical account of Clark’s creation of Silicon Graphics, Netscape and Healtheon. It’s also a wider look at the heady days of the Internet bubble of the late 1990s, when venture capitalists and IPOs threw billions of dollars at companies that didn’t actually know how to make money. The tech bubble’s massive burst in 2000 ushered in a global recession that remains one of the defining facets of contemporary economic life. Despite the jaw-dropping and gut-wrenching financial losses, there were still market winners — but were they actually the people like Clark, who walked away with billions in the bank?